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proof of/for learning (pt. 2)

proof of/for learning (pt. 2)

As we step foot into more classrooms and have conversations with more teachers, I’m further intrigued by how competency-based learning is being implemented in classrooms. And on top of that: how teachers are rising to the challenge of documenting and assessing this new style of learning.

With students at different skill levels being encouraged to explore their own topics and express their learning in their own unique ways, the role of a teacher is something akin to a magical, omniscient, balancing acrobat.

In Part 1, I talked about teachers new roles as coaches, guiding their apprentice students to become master learners. I discussed how technology can facilitate this process by being a documentation tool for teachers and students to use for later reflection—similar to how a coach reviews gametape with their players.

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This is how I see skill development being supported in the classroom.

  • ACCURACY - Documentation helps teachers (and peers) provide tailored feedback and gives students something tangible to reference. Self-reflection and accuracy in self-assessment improve with this record of proof and feedback.

  • AWARENESS - Put students in charge of documenting their learning. It’s a different cognitive process when students take on the role of the teacher.

  • GROWTH - Making feedback transparent between students and teachers creates a culture of “partnership”. We are identifying strengths and challenges together and making plans for improvements together. As the student becomes more aware, the teacher’s role is to support—not dictate—student goals.

what have i missed? is there something else needed to better support skill-based learning in classrooms?

Teach Me: Self-Assessment as a Competence

Teach Me: Self-Assessment as a Competence

What to Do with those Wonderings

What to Do with those Wonderings